Sunday, 14 June 2009

Gerry Adams' cunning plan for a united Ireland. He can't tell you about it, you know about it and if you don't, you'll find out.

One might suppose that, having purportedly accepted the principle of consent, Sinn Féin had better spend its time convincing people in Northern Ireland of the merits of Irish unity. But with the Republic's economy more closely resembling a bedraggled tabby than a sleek, formidable tiger and the imminent prospect of a British government which actively encourages Northern Ireland's continued participation in the Union, Gerry Adams is reduced to convening a conference of Irish Americans, in order to pursue his mythical 32 County Celtic utopia.

The gathering included luminaries such as Brian Keenan. Not the deceased IRA man, addressing delegates by video link from hell, but rather the pretentious poet-hostage whom discerning Lebanese literature fans confined to a small cell for four years in a vain attempt to protect the reading public from his offences. Unfortunately Islamic Jihad's public-spiritedness did not last forever and their former detainee acquired an audience for unwieldy, tortuous prose after his release.

Star of the 'Irish unity' show, however, was another sentimental nationalist known for the woeful quality of his writing. Unionists will be concerned to learn that Adams is 'confident' that Ireland will be united within a generation. Conversely they will be heartened to read his clear and helpful advice as to how that outcome might be brought about.

"I can’t tell you how to do it. You know how to do it. and if you don’t, you’ll find out.”


OK Gerry.

18 comments:

Timothy Belmont said...

I'm afraid I simply do not understand what makes people like Keenan tick. Wasn't he brought up in the Protestant/Unionist tradition at Orangefield? Since when did he transgress; and what caused him to take such a path?
I recall that, when he was held hostage, his sisters took a lot of flak from Tullycarnet or somewhere like that.
It has me stumped.

Chekov said...

What has me stumped Tim is a man who was detained for four years by terrorists now helping them out.

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Timothy Belmont said...

Yes Chekov, there is an uncanny irony somewhere there. I imagine Keenan never considered them terrorists. Heaven knows.

fair_deal said...

From his latest blog piece it is seems he has in a state of confusion. he can work out how birds fairies and angels fly but not airplanes

http://leargas.blogspot.com/2009/06/my-flight-for-irish-freedom.html

Chekov said...

I particularly enjoyed that piece too.

Dewi Harries said...

Chekov - don't know why you mention the South's economic difficulties. It would make absolutely no difference to your viewpoint whatever the comparative wealth. Correct?

Chekov said...

The Republic's economic difficulties are relevant, Dewi, because the undermine the argument for a united Ireland. My personal position is neither here nor there.

Dewi Harries said...

I'm not sure that economic factors play a huge part in many peoples views on unity. The more persuavive approach is the secularisation of sothern society.

Dec said...
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Anonymous said...

Scratch the surface of "non-sectarian", "liberal" unionism and it doesn't take much for the resentment of the "rotten Prod" to come out, does it?

Chekov said...

No such sentiment anon - just disdain for sentimental nationalism.

Dec said...
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Dec said...
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O'Neill said...

"Scratch the surface of "non-sectarian", "liberal" unionism and it doesn't take much for the resentment of the "rotten Prod" to come out, does it?"

Anonymous perceives that Keenan is of the same faith as Chekov, therefore "Anonymous" believes that perceived "shared faith" should prevent Chekov from criticising his politics?

Anonymous said...

Timothy Belmont:

"Wasn't he brought up in the Protestant/Unionist tradition at Orangefield? Since when did he transgress; and what caused him to take such a path?"

Chekov: a man who was detained for four years by terrorists now helping them out

T. Belmont: I imagine Keenan never considered them terrorists.

As I said, the bile directed at someone who strays from the "Protestant/Unionist tradition" is instructive.

Note that it was "Lord Belmont" who intertwined the two, so you can take it up with him.

O'Neill said...
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O'Neill said...

"Scratch the surface of "non-sectarian", "liberal" unionism and it doesn't take much for the resentment of the "rotten Prod" to come out, does it?"

Anonymous,

Nice attempt at diversion, wasn’t your original comment above obviously aimed at Chekov?

I’ll ask you again, why is attacking someone from the same perceived faith for their political views (as per your definition) "sectarian" and "illiberal"?