Posts

PoliticalOD podcast Episode 4: Party manoeuvres, fighting the last election who who knows what will happen

In the latest PoliticalOD podcast, The Dissenter and I discuss the election and how the contest will pan out in Northern Ireland. The various anti-DUP pacts and the MPs standing down. Nationally, we ask whether we'll have a Tory government that rushes through the Withdrawal Agreement or a Labour administration that means more delay.

Listen above, or:

Download at Podbean.

Listen on Spotify.

Find us on iTunes.

Find us on Pocketcasts.


Political OD podcast episode 3:

In the latest Political OD podcast (recorded 16/10/2019), David and I discuss the De Souza campaign's attack on British citizenship in Northern Ireland and the Irish Republic's Father Ted economic model, which involves international companies' money resting in Dublin's account.

For more on the issues covered, read The Dissenter's piece on the Phantom Menace of the parasitic Irish economy. And here's my article covering the De Souza case.

Listen above, or:

Download at Podbean.

Listen on Spotify.

Find us on iTunes.

Find us on Pocketcasts.

If you enjoy our chat, don't forget to subscribe wherever you choose to listen.


PoliticalOD Podcast episode 2: Swanning on. The Rabble Alliance. The big issue bubbling.

The Dissenter and I discuss Robin Swann's decision to quit as UUP leader, chaos in parliament and the Conservative Party conference.



Download at Podbean.

Listen on Spotify.

Find us on iTunes.

Find us on Pocket Casts.

We're on Podcast Addict and a few others too. Bear with us if the new episode doesn't show up immediately in your favourite service. Sometimes it takes a little while for it to pick up the RSS feed.

Political OD podcast

This is something of an experiment. David, from The Dissenter, and I have recorded a short podcast, Political OD.

We hope that fairly regularly we'll have a look at political developments in Northern Ireland and beyond, to try to make sense of what's going on. Inevitably, the first episode asks; Backstop or go? And we discuss whether David Cameron is a hero or a villain.

The perspective is unionist, but we'll try and take a broader view, touching on international politics.

The first episode is a trial and it was recorded without any fancy equipment. Still, the quality if perfectly ok to hear what we're saying. Do have a listen and let us know what you think. @3000Versts@thedissenter


Download the podcast here.

And follow for subsequent episodes.

Find us on Pocket Casts here.

Ditch the dogma - do the deal

In the imagination of remainers, the Tory European Research Group is a cadre of irreconcilable Brexit ultras, determined to wrench the UK from the EU in chaotic fashion. It’s ironic then, that the ERG’s latest paper is one of the calmest contributions to the Irish border debate, delivering low-key, rather technical solutions to practical problems raised by the frontier, rather than overheated rhetoric.
The document draws heavily on the work of Dr Graham Gudgin, the Cambridge University academic who has examined forensically Brexit’s potential impact in Ireland at the think-tank, Policy Exchange. The audience at its publication included two former secretaries of state for Northern Ireland, Owen Paterson and Theresa Villiers, as well as Lord Trimble, unionist architect of the Belfast Agreement.
The ERG’s aim in writing this paper was fairly straight-forward. Come up with a set of arrangements that will avoid the need for new physical checks and infrastructure at the border between Nort…

Russia staged the best World Cup of modern times

The bitterness when Russia pipped England in the race to stage the World Cup was palpable.

Very soon, there were incessant implications that the tournament would be a disaster and countless attempts to organise a boycott on flimsy pretexts. Nick Clegg was one of the quickest out of the blocks, demanding British teams refuse to participate in protest at the Kremlin’s insistence on confronting Jihadist maniacs in Syria.
Russia’s stubbornly independent foreign policy and resistance to western groupthink has resulted in it being treated as a pariah. Yet it confounded its critics by staging the most entertaining World Cup in living memory and proved itself an exceptional host. From the opening ceremony to the trophy presentation, which took place in a near biblical rainstorm, Russia 2018 was an unqualified triumph.
The conspiracy theorists will allege that Vladimir Putin stage-managed the event carefully in order to cultivate a positive image of his country (as if micromanaging the experi…

Corbyn will never be trusted on Northern Ireland

Image
Jeremy Corbyn’s first visit to Northern Ireland as leader of the opposition was never likely to be greeted with enthusiasm by unionists. Hardly anyone is gullible enough to fall for his attempts to explain away decades of overt sympathy for the IRA. He retains links to Sinn Fein’s leaders and, just days ago, he reaffirmed his preference for a ‘united Ireland’, which, his spokesman says, “the majority of those people across the island” want to see.
Even before Corbyn arrived in Belfast last week, his itinerary generated controversy.
The Labour leader did not meet local members of his own party, who have been involved in a protracted struggle with their leadership to stand candidates in Northern Ireland elections. They argue that voters deserve ‘equal citizenship’ and the chance to vote for parties that can form the UK government, but they’re unlikely to persuade Corbyn, who hasn’t renounced his belief that the British state is an occupying force in Ireland.
He also declined to meet vi…